Learning from web videos

So I downloaded my lesson from tangomeet.com (an online tango school
by Sebastian Arce y Mariana Montes), a 12 minute web video that presents and explains how to do an elegant, close embrace change of direction sequence. (In your browser extension store you can find ways to download varieties of formats from YouTube and elsewhere. Make a comment to this blog post if you’d like help with something. Fair use only! Observe copyrights.) The Chrome browser extension Vimeo Download Videos let me grab the material, and then in Windows Live Movie Maker I can quickly scan the whole thing, snip out the few brief bits I want to focus on, and then save it in a more compact format. What was 240 MB shrank to 8 MB!

The interesting thing I noticed in this process was that the key learning concept may boil down to a single element. For example, this was an elegant looking change of direction that can easily be done entirely in close embrace and which takes little space to do. I’ll describe the entire sequence and highlight the key concept.

From an ocho cortado, he steps around her to his right, causing her to make a tiny step forward and pivot on her front-crossed (L) foot. He steps backwards and around with left leg, leading her to uncross and step into him on his right, the closed side. This is #3 of the eight-count basic, but going backwards. Key concept: That step back uses inertia to step-pivot counter-clockwise the entire couple as a unit. Instead of dissociating, he moves as a unit, intending to immediately pivot his right side (and her) around to the left on stepping. He is leading her to pivot backwards as a unit. (Both keeping their thighs tight!) He finishes the pivot by bringing right leg back to close, while she does a molinete to end just left of him in perpendicular position. He gives her parada with left leg. She steps over, then pivots back to end square in front of him.

Not to minimize the importance of a good beginning and ending to a sequence that, like the punctuation of a sentence, give it a resolution. But they do tend to obscure key concepts that introduce a new movement and understanding of axes.

Por ejemplo, could this pivot also be done in the clockwise direction toward her? Well why not try it! Now suppose we continue our exercises by trying all possible combinations:

  • Direction of step: he stepping forward or he stepping backward
  • Direction of pivot: clockwise or counter-clockwise
  • Side of embrace: he on open side or he on closed side

Notice, too, that this is a cross-step pattern so far. That is, he back-crossed with her forward-crossed or vice-versa. Would these sorts of pivots be possible in an open-step? What does that do to the couple’s alignment if they step together and pivot? Does it help or hinder for him to step longer or shorter than her? What if he steps across her path after (or before!) she steps? Ah, that looks like a sacada.

This is the sort of exploratory play that I am wanting to do at practicas and in my home gym/dance space. In the past I haven’t much gone to practicas because they always seemed to work just like a milonga, with everybody “practicing” what they already know and do. I want to discover the things I don’t know, as well as structured couples practice to enhance the quality of things I do (or should) know.

If you find yourself with an opportunity to be in southwest Austin and want to explore Argentine tango, please get in touch. If we’re not friends yet, email to david at this website address can start the process.

Thanks!
  –David

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